Electrifying Elastics

The year 1976; the first commercially developed supercomputer is released, the Winter Olympics take place in Austria, the Summer Games are held in Montreal, NFL great Peyton Manning is born, the Apple Computer company is formed, the first LAGEOS is launched, and perhaps the most pivotal for me – though still a few years from […]

The year 1976; the first commercially developed supercomputer is released, the Winter Olympics take place in Austria, the Summer Games are held in Montreal, NFL great Peyton Manning is born, the Apple Computer company is formed, the first LAGEOS is launched, and perhaps the most pivotal for me – though still a few years from my birth – Kenner releases the Stretch Armstrong action figure. In the 1990’s Stretch had a reemergence. And thank the heavens for it. I loved that toy. What boy didn’t?

A stocky, muscle bound man in a black speedo who could be contorted and pulled beyond proportional reality, what could be more fun? The appeal of the toy, on the surface, seemed to be his superhuman ability to be twisted and extended. Looking back, I believe what made the toy so successful wasn’t how herculean and exceptional it was, but rather, how human.

We live in a soft world. I don’t care what your workout regiment may consist of; most of the human body is made of soft parts. We may not be able to stretch our arms across a room, but we do stretch, we contort, we are somewhat malleable beings.  Our actions are not static or rigid, and the world, for the most part, isn’t either. Most action figures are. They are hard, very stationary plastic. Stretch was far more human in feel and movement than any toy made before.

So, one must ponder, in a soft, fluid world, why are so many of the parts we use stiff and hard? CEO Benjamin O’Brien and CTO Todd Gisby, both PhD’s and both New Zealanders, have been brooding over this quandary for quite some time, and they have found a solution to the problem: StretchSense.

Think rubber bands with Bluetooth. StretchSense makes sensors, which are designed to unobtrusively measure strains all across the size spectrum and communicate the data to a Bluetooth enabled device, such as a smartphone, with extreme accuracy and without the need for constant recalibration.

The sensors provide precise, secure data when stretched repetitively, measuring human body motion to do such things as make far superior electro-skeletons.  It’s not just body motion, however, that this technology can monitor. It can be utilized in a multitude of industries, changing the framework of sensor motorization for most every platform.

Sports and fitness, virtual reality, anything and everything that bends, contorts, or pulls can now be monitored with supreme precision, thanks to StretchSense. Order a kit and try it yourself, but either way, this technology will be affecting your life in a very positive way, in a very short time.


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